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GVWR - What does it really mean?


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#1 OFFLINE   dubob

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 07:06 AM

Now before you get your knickers all in a knot; I AM NOT casting stones at anybody for their beliefs. I respect your right to have any beliefs with which you are comfortable and happy. Please don’t take offense because I might disagree with your beliefs.  I'm always willing to participate in rational discussions and sincerely hope this is one of those.

 

I know I’m just a newbie on this site, but I’ve been an RV’er for a good portion of my adult life (70 years young and counting) and have owned everything except a Class B motorhome. I’m always glad to learn new stuff from others as well as share my knowledge when appropriate. I’ve been a Trailer Life/Motorhome Life Magazine subscriber for a long time. I’ve talked with truck dealers and truck owners all over the USA about GVWR limitations and have come to the conclusion that very few people REALLY have a handle on GVWR and what is really involved in calculating this figure by the manufacturer of the truck.


What I’ve learned over the years is this; the GVWR takes a lot of components into consideration that include but are not limited to the entire drive train (engine, transmission, drive shaft, axles, suspension system, frame, wheels, tires, etc). Each manufacturer has a different methodology for computing the GVWR and it is highly unlikely that any two will be the same. And because there isn’t one standard used by all manufacturers, it is very difficult to intelligently determine which truck actually has the highest GVWR.


Sure, they all put a tag on the vehicle that tells you what the GVWR is and a call to any manufacturer will get you an actual payload for that truck as it left the factory. But that payload figure will be changed every time ANYTHING is added or removed from the truck. Add a receiver hitch, remove a tailgate, add a 3-ball mount or hitch extender, add running boards or nurf bars, switch wheels from steel to aluminum, etc., etc., etc. The only way to know for sure is to weigh the truck as you own it with a full tank of fuel.


And can you change any of the factory components to increase the GVWR as stated on the factory tag? That all depends on who you talk to and who you believe. If you talk to ANY factory representative, the answer will most definitely be no. If you talk to any of the technical representatives writing for publications that cater to the RV’ing public the answer will be no. If you talk to RV’ers driving trucks and hauling trailers and campers the answers will be some yes and some no. Why is that? I don’t have a clue.


Some believe and will tell you that you can increase the GVWR by going to a bigger and stronger wheel/tire combination. Some will tell you that you can increase the GVWR by replacing the axle with a stronger model. Some will tell you that the factory figures have a built in safety factor of some percent value and you can exceed the GVWR a little and still be safe (do not try to tell your insurance company this – it won’t work). These same folks will also tell you they have done this and have ‘x’ number of miles or ‘y’ number of years doing it this way and have never had a single problem or breakdown. Well, I know some folks that smoked their entire adult lives, lived past 80, and did not die of lung cancer. That doesn’t mean that smoking isn’t, in fact, related to lung cancer.


In case you haven’t figured it out by now, I’m one who believes that whatever truck you own, you are limited to whatever GVWR is on the factory tag. If you need a higher payload capacity, you are going to have to buy a higher capacity truck. You can add all sorts of aftermarket gizmos and whiz bangs to make the truck perform better, run more efficiently, eliminate or curtail yaw, pitch, and roll; but you can’t change the GVWR by adding or changing a couple of weight bearing or drive train components after market.


If you have knowledge of, or access to, any reputable, scientific studies that say otherwise, I’d really like to see them. I’m always eager to learn and educate myself.


:usa:
Bob Hicks, from Utah
I’m 76 years young and going as hard as I can for as long as I can.
“Free men don't ask permission to bear arms.” ― Glen Aldrich
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and those who matter don’t mind.” ― Dr. Seuss

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#2 OFFLINE   KnightEagle

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 10:54 AM

Well Bob you have touch off a issue that going to cause quite a stir here. It comes up every 3-4 months or so. There are basicly five types of TC. those that fit 1/2 tons only, ones that fit 1/2-3/4 tons only, those that are for 1/2-1 tons, a small group that fit the short bed trucks, and those that are for DRW 1 tons and up. those that are what 7' 8" basicly are SRW and 8' are for DRW but some say that's not true but it can be a guide. Spoke with the guy that writes for TCM he was checking my Dodge out and said " finally someones matched a dodge with a TC right". Main thing added was a sway bar and super stablizerser's from sumo spring, yes air bags just to raise it to level pos again. All the time watching my fig.


  :sign0007: I got it fixed!

 

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#3 OFFLINE   dubob

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 01:08 PM

I hope none of what I’ve offered up will cause anybody any grief.  :sign0089: 

 

It looks like most folks on here have at least a modicum of common sense and are just trying to be good Samaritans by offering advice and tips they hope will help the next guy.  That’s all I had in mind when I was writing my post.

 

I know that air bags, sway bars, shocks, helper springs, tires, wheels, and a host of other aftermarket products will make things easier for us TC owners.  But none of them, to the best of MY knowledge, will ever increase the GVWR established by the truck manufacturer.

 

I did read something this morning that gave me hope for the future.  I saw an article on truckcamper.com showing payloads for all three American trucks are now well up into the 6k range and Chevrolet is boasting a max payload of 7.2k on one of their offerings.  Who’d a thunk it?  Seven thousand pounds plus on a pick-up.

 

I’m already looking forward to trading up in a couple years or so.  :happy0064: 


:usa:
Bob Hicks, from Utah
I’m 76 years young and going as hard as I can for as long as I can.
“Free men don't ask permission to bear arms.” ― Glen Aldrich
“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter,
and those who matter don’t mind.” ― Dr. Seuss

2010 Chevy Silverado 2500HD, SRW, 6.0L gas/2011 Lance 992


#4 OFFLINE   wirenut

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 02:52 PM

That's a heck of a post for post #2.

Welcome to the forum.

I can change my GVWR with a Sharpie. :P

Here's my perspective:

I really don't care what the manufacturer says the GVWR is. I just care about what the truck can do. If I replace the entire drive train, both axles, all of the suspension, reinforce the frame, and add different tires and wheels have I increased the manufacturers GVWR? No, not one pound.Have I increased the physical and mechanical capability of a machine to do a job and support a load? Absolutely.

I don't know why people get so hung up on GVWR. Yes it's a combination of factors, including dancing around laws. Many trucks are rated 9,900 pounds because laws change when you hit 10,000. Many trucks are avaialble with optional GVWRs lower than standard to get under other weight laws. GVWR is not a legal issue. Commercial trucking and DOT don't care what the GVWR is. It's all about axle and tire loading, ie what can the actual components handle. You can license your truck for whatever you want. My dually is rated 11,400 by Chevy but is licensed for 14,000 because when hauling my camper and boat I weigh in at 13,500. If I was licensed at 11,400 I would be over weight and could get a ticket. Since I'm licensed for 14,000 and not exceeding axle, tire, or wheel ratings I'm legal and nobody cares that I'm over 11,400.

I know of guys using 2500 pick-ups to pull GN flatbeds hauling equipment. They are licensed for 30,000 and more. They are sometimes stopped and inspected by DOT and no one cares what the truck's GVWR is.

I do beleive in safety. That's why I know my weight. I know the ratings of my all of my truck's components. I've added or changed components that weren't up to the task. I frequently weight my rig to be sure my weights haven't changed. I keep everything in good repair. I obey the speed limits and any other traffic laws.

But I don't care what some lawyer/engineer wrote on my truck 8 years ago before I got a hold of it.



#5 OFFLINE   farmer

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 06:23 PM

Hi Dubob
Welcome to the forum.
I'm getting older and wear glasses, but am still finding it hard to read your posting, could you possibly change your font on your replies.

As for the Gvwr question, my opinion, yes you can upgrade your suspension to carry more weight safely, and most do.
But the GVWR on the vehicle is established by the truck engineers and is stamped on the vehicle identification plate as what they recommend as to capacity, if a accident happens and you are found to be overloaded, they have covered their a$$ legal wise.

It's up to the individual how they want to live their life, in our area we are legaly required to wear helmets when you are bicycle riding, only half the people do.

Nowhere on any forum have I read where people have improved their suspension , carrying capacity and use higher rated tires,

And at the same time upgraded their brakes to help stop this heavier weight, what you can't see won't hurt you, at least the load sits level.

The saving grace, is that most truck camper owners have above average common sense and drive slower when they are hauling a big top heavy load.
Rick

#6 OFFLINE   sooty1234

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 10:59 PM

wirenut, a great post. Right On !!!!!!



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#7 OFFLINE   dubob

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 06:27 AM

wirenut, on 05 Apr 2013 - 16:58, said:

That's a heck of a post for post #2.  What the Hell; I thought I should get my feet wet right off the bat.

Welcome to the forum.  Thank you Sir; I think I’m going to like it here.

 

I’m going to make some comments in amongst your post.  They are not meant to be snarky or picky.  Overall, I thought your points were well thought out and made sense more or less and I thank you for your input.  It’s never too late to keep learning new stuff.

 

I can change my GVWR with a Sharpie.  :sign0020:

Here's my perspective:

 

I really don't care what the manufacturer says the GVWR is. I just care about what the truck can do.  If I replace the entire drive train, both axles, all of the suspension, reinforce the frame, and add different tires and wheels have I increased the manufacturers GVWR? No, not one pound.  Have I increased the physical and mechanical capability of a machine to do a job and support a load? Absolutely.  My only concern here would be what is the weakest link in ALL the components that effect the GVWR and has THAT link been changed and is now capable of supporting your increased load.

 

I don't know why people get so hung up on GVWR. Yes it's a combination of factors, including dancing around laws. Many trucks are rated 9,900 pounds because laws change when you hit 10,000. Many trucks are avaialble with optional GVWRs lower than standard to get under other weight laws.  GVWR is not a legal issue. Commercial trucking and DOT don't care what the GVWR is. It's all about axle and tire loading, ie what can the actual components handle. You can license your truck for whatever you want. My dually is rated 11,400 by Chevy but is licensed for 14,000 because when hauling my camper and boat I weigh in at 13,500. If I was licensed at 11,400 I would be over weight and could get a ticket. Since I'm licensed for 14,000 and not exceeding axle, tire, or wheel ratings I'm legal and nobody cares that I'm over 11,400.  Fortunately for me living in Utah, we don’t have that requirement to register with a gross weight anymore.  Our registration and fee system is now age based instead of weight based so that doesn’t really come into play for me.  I don’t have a clue what requirements will affect me in other states but that will need to be looked into for sure.

 

I know of guys using 2500 pick-ups to pull GN flatbeds hauling equipment. They are licensed for 30,000 and more. They are sometimes stopped and inspected by DOT and no one cares what the truck's GVWR is.

 

I do beleive in safety. That's why I know my weight. I know the ratings of my all of my truck's components.  This is a sincere question and in no way is meant to be facetious; do you know which component is the weakest link (has the lowest weight rating) in your system?  How/where were you able to find that information?  I honestly don’t know how I would find out what that is in my system.  I think tires and wheels are easily determined, but I don’t have a clue about the rest of the components.

 

I've added or changed components that weren't up to the task.   I don’t think you actually meant to say you added components that weren’t up to the task.  :thumbs_up: 

 

I frequently weight my rig to be sure my weights haven't changed. I keep everything in good repair. I obey the speed limits and any other traffic laws.  All good points that should make sense to everybody. 

 

But I don't care what some lawyer/engineer wrote on my truck 8 years ago before I got a hold of it. 


:usa:
Bob Hicks, from Utah
I’m 76 years young and going as hard as I can for as long as I can.
“Free men don't ask permission to bear arms.” ― Glen Aldrich
“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter,
and those who matter don’t mind.” ― Dr. Seuss

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#8 OFFLINE   dubob

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 06:42 AM

farmer, on 05 Apr 2013 - 20:29, said:

Hi Dubob
Welcome to the forum.  Thank you Sir.


I'm getting older and wear glasses, but am still finding it hard to read your posting, could you possibly change your font on your replies.  I’m using a larger font now; is this better?

As for the Gvwr question, my opinion, yes you can upgrade your suspension to carry more weight safely, and most do.
But the GVWR on the vehicle is established by the truck engineers and is stamped on the vehicle identification plate as what they recommend as to capacity, if a accident happens and you are found to be overloaded, they have covered their a$$ legal wise.  I’m thinking insurance companies will also take a dim view of carrying a load in access of the GVWR established by the manufacturer and could possibly refuse to pay a claim if they discovered that you were over weight based on the GVWR tag on your truck.  I don’t know that to be a fact; I’m just guessing that it might be the case.

It's up to the individual how they want to live their life, in our area we are legaly required to wear helmets when you are bicycle riding, only half the people do.

Nowhere on any forum have I read where people have improved their suspension , carrying capacity and use higher rated tires, and at the same time upgraded their brakes to help stop this heavier weight, what you can't see won't hurt you, at least the load sits level.  I suspect that is by and large the case with the vast majority of folks that changed components; they never thought about whether their brake system would handle the access load.

The saving grace, is that most truck camper owners have above average common sense and drive slower when they are hauling a big top heavy load.  I for sure do exactly that.  And I also give myself LOTS of room to stop between me and the vehicle ahead of me.  Not hard to do when you travel slower than almost everybody else on the road.  :fing32: 


Rick


Edited by dubob, 06 April 2013 - 06:44 AM.

:usa:
Bob Hicks, from Utah
I’m 76 years young and going as hard as I can for as long as I can.
“Free men don't ask permission to bear arms.” ― Glen Aldrich
“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter,
and those who matter don’t mind.” ― Dr. Seuss

2010 Chevy Silverado 2500HD, SRW, 6.0L gas/2011 Lance 992


#9 OFFLINE   dubob

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 06:49 AM

Many trucks are avaialble with optional GVWRs lower than standard to get under other weight laws.

Are you sure about? I'm sorry, but with all due respect, I've never heard that before and don't know that I believe it. Can you show me a reference that would verify that to be true?


:usa:
Bob Hicks, from Utah
I’m 76 years young and going as hard as I can for as long as I can.
“Free men don't ask permission to bear arms.” ― Glen Aldrich
“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter,
and those who matter don’t mind.” ― Dr. Seuss

2010 Chevy Silverado 2500HD, SRW, 6.0L gas/2011 Lance 992


#10 OFFLINE   Bedlam

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 09:45 AM

Ford offers a downgraded weight rating when you order your truck through fleet sales. It keeps the the truck bellow the next tier of driver requirements if used commercially.

 

If your vehicle has a heavier duty counterpart, you can compare replacement part numbers with your vehicle to find the differences. This will give you an idea at the potential you can reach by switching out these differences. Following the source of parts allows you to see the ratings the supplier applies to these parts - This will also show you potential increases if the vehicle manufacturer matched these parts with lower rated components.

 

Here is an example: The 2005 Ford F250 (same frame as F350 SRW & DRW) uses a 9750 lb 10.5" Sterling axle mated to 6100 lb rated springs (which are identical to the 7000lb springs in the F350) on  3250 lb steel rims and 3100 lb 245/75R17 tires. Going to higher rated rims and tires and a taller axle block effectively upgrades this F250 to a F350 SRW with no other part differences. All components at this point meet your manufacturer's standard for carrying a heavier load, yet you tag has not changed. Legally you may be constrained to the tag but physically have added capacity.


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#11 OFFLINE   KnightEagle

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 10:39 AM

So true Bedlam with Dodge the axle of the 3500 and 4500 are the same just the overloads are defferent. their are three step up grades. But at a price step 1 will cause a drop in towing and increase to step three where you have max payload yet cant tow still puzzed about that.


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#12 OFFLINE   wirenut

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 01:17 PM

Are you sure about? I'm sorry, but with all due respect, I've never heard that before and don't know that I believe it. Can you show me a reference that would verify that to be true?

One I've looked at a lot is Dodge 4500 trucks. I really want one. One their build site the truck normally has a 16,500 GVWR. It is available with a 15,000 GVWR. I think this is because if you had the 16,500 and were towing a trailer rated for 10,000 you would need a class A CDL because it would put the combination over 26,000. With the lower 15,000 rating and a 10,000 trailer you are under the 26,000 limit. I don't know if this is the reason or not but it is offered with both ratings. The truck is the same. I beleive Ford trucks also have some optional ratings. I've heard it discussed several times.

 

Somebody brought up brakes, good point. In some states you can tow a trailer up to 3,000 pounds without brakes. In most states you can tow a trailer at least 1,000 pounds  with no brakes. I would have to assume (which is dangerous) that truck makers must take this into account and make their braking systems capable of stopping a fully loaded truck (maxed GVWR) plus the possible weight of a trailer not equipped with brakes. This extra margin basically covers my additional weight past the GVWR. Then there's exhaust brakes. I don't know of any trucks where choosing the optional exhaust brake increased the GVWR but it would certainly increase your stopping power.



#13 OFFLINE   dubob

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 03:01 PM

wirenut, on 06 Apr 2013 - 15:23, said:

One I've looked at a lot is Dodge 4500 trucks. I really want one. One their build site the truck normally has a 16,500 GVWR. It is available with a 15,000 GVWR. I think this is because if you had the 16,500 and were towing a trailer rated for 10,000 you would need a class A CDL because it would put the combination over 26,000. With the lower 15,000 rating and a 10,000 trailer you are under the 26,000 limit. I don't know if this is the reason or not but it is offered with both ratings. The truck is the same. I beleive Ford trucks also have some optional ratings. I've heard it discussed several times. I did not know that. I find that information interesting.

 

Somebody brought up brakes, good point. In some states you can tow a trailer up to 3,000 pounds without brakes. In most states you can tow a trailer at least 1,000 pounds with no brakes. I would have to assume (which is dangerous) that truck makers must take this into account and make their braking systems capable of stopping a fully loaded truck (maxed GVWR) plus the possible weight of a trailer not equipped with brakes. This extra margin basically covers my additional weight past the GVWR. Then there's exhaust brakes. I don't know of any trucks where choosing the optional exhaust brake increased the GVWR but it would certainly increase your stopping power.

 

Ah; brakes! Another interesting subject. I don’t know for sure, but would guess that any truck manufacturer would have to build the brakes strong enough (rated) to handle the Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) of the said vehicle. But I could be wrong since some trailers over certain weights must have brakes as well.  And that figure varies by state so where does the truck maker draw the line?  And of course, the GCWR would include any trailered load you want to pull with your TC already on board your truck. With that in mind, I would think that increasing the load carrying capacity of your truck with any of the products/methods already mentioned above such that you weren’t over capacity with your TC loaded would not put you in any danger of exceeding your stopping ability as long as your GCWR has not been exceeded.

 

I had an interesting discussion with a close, personal friend that has been in the trucking industry for about 30 years. His comment was that for weight considerations the weakest link in the drive train is almost ALWAYS the tires. Axles do break on the big rigs but it is a rare occurrence. Tires go all the time and usually from lack of tire knowledge or carelessness in tire maintenance on the part of the driver.

 

Anyway, lots of good to know stuff here that I wasn’t aware of just a couple of weeks ago.


Edited by dubob, 06 April 2013 - 03:05 PM.

:usa:
Bob Hicks, from Utah
I’m 76 years young and going as hard as I can for as long as I can.
“Free men don't ask permission to bear arms.” ― Glen Aldrich
“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter,
and those who matter don’t mind.” ― Dr. Seuss

2010 Chevy Silverado 2500HD, SRW, 6.0L gas/2011 Lance 992


#14 OFFLINE   dubob

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 03:09 PM

Here is an example: The 2005 Ford F250 (same frame as F350 SRW & DRW) uses a 9750 lb 10.5" Sterling axle mated to 6100 lb rated springs (which are identical to the 7000lb springs in the F350) on  3250 lb steel rims and 3100 lb 245/75R17 tires. Going to higher rated rims and tires and a taller axle block effectively upgrades this F250 to a F350 SRW with no other part differences. All components at this point meet your manufacturer's standard for carrying a heavier load, yet you tag has not changed. Legally you may be constrained to the tag but physically have added capacity.

As my friend indicated, the tires are the weakest link.


:usa:
Bob Hicks, from Utah
I’m 76 years young and going as hard as I can for as long as I can.
“Free men don't ask permission to bear arms.” ― Glen Aldrich
“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter,
and those who matter don’t mind.” ― Dr. Seuss

2010 Chevy Silverado 2500HD, SRW, 6.0L gas/2011 Lance 992


#15 OFFLINE   ernge

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 06:24 AM

Yes, the GVWR is extremely important but the Devil is in the details.  The self-proclaimed TC weight and center of gravity Police, Gordon of Truck Camper Magazine,  is quick to criticize units over the GVWR or for that matter even if they appear to be over.  He spent a considerable amount of effort (which is a good thing) to match his new truck and new TC.  He had the assistance of the GM factory and the TC manufacturer and detailed every item and equipment being carried in unit, yet, if he had not taken off the factory trailer hitch his unit would be over the GVWR.

No truck manufacturer will advocate exceeding  the GVWR but there is a safety factor.  Having abused pickups for many decades, they can take a punishment but need add ons to be safe.

My point is that a TC is an extra ordinary load and needs aftermarket items to fit each individual need regardless whether it is above or below the GVWR.  In addition to weight, the overall size and configuration (tall and wide box) makes a TC  unwieldy. I dare say that the center of gravity changes greatly once the unit is loaded with personal gear and the side to side weight differential makes it impossible for a truck to perform with a particular TC without specific add ons. One size (GVWR) doesn’t fit all.

This forum is really good at getting help from someone that has a truck and TC similar to yours and what they did to improve handling. 



#16 OFFLINE   dubob

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 07:12 AM

Some good points there Ernge.  There are a ton of after market products that will improve the performance and handling of your truck under a heavy load.  I'm learning a lot about them here and I'm going to add a few to my rig. 

 

I mean no disrespect, but I ain't buying one of your points.  I've heard this old wives tale for more years than I care to count.

No truck manufacturer will advocate exceeding  the GVWR but there is a safety factor.

 

If you can produce any recognized study or paper that will substantiate that there is in fact a safety factor built into truck suspensions I'll change my opinion on the subject. But for now, I ain't buying it.


:usa:
Bob Hicks, from Utah
I’m 76 years young and going as hard as I can for as long as I can.
“Free men don't ask permission to bear arms.” ― Glen Aldrich
“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter,
and those who matter don’t mind.” ― Dr. Seuss

2010 Chevy Silverado 2500HD, SRW, 6.0L gas/2011 Lance 992


#17 OFFLINE   ernge

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 08:01 AM

No one can produce such documentation. All engineered products have a load design and a breaking load point. I wish I could remember who made some great posts about how he tested trucks to the breaking point for a manufacturer. Many others have suggested that the difference between the factory GVWR and the total capacity of the factory rated tires is probably the safety factor.

#18 OFFLINE   Rusty Bridges

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 12:03 PM

. My dually is rated 11,400 by Chevy but is licensed for 14,000 because when hauling my camper and boat I weigh in at 13,500. If I was licensed at 11,400 I would be over weight and could get a ticket. Since I'm licensed for 14,000 and not exceeding axle, tire, or wheel ratings I'm legal and nobody cares that I'm over 11,400.  Fortunately for me living in Utah, we don’t have that requirement to register with a gross weight anymore.  Our registration and fee system is now age based instead of weight based so that doesn’t really come into play for me.  I don’t have a clue what requirements will affect me in other states but that will need to be looked into for sure.

 

This is a REVENUE issue, not a Legal issue. Alabama started this a few years ago. Most pick ups had passenger plates, the state changed the law to make passenger plates "up to 8,000# gross" which forced people using their trucks for their designed purpose (hauling) to buy more expensive plates. Heck, my DRW is over 8,000# unladen. So the state made classifications for 10K, 12K, 14K, etc. each class increases the annual cost of the plates. 10K + $35, 12K + $105, 14K + I don't recall (and I won't lie to ya) but you get the idea. If the troopers see a heavy laden truck without a plate designating it's GVW or that it may be more than the GVW for it's plate, they will stop the truck and weigh it. If it exceeds the GVW indicated by the plate the driver gets a healthy fine. SO, it is all about REVENUE not SAFETY. Revenue on the plate and revenue in fines. Shortly after passage of the law Troopers set up a roadblock on the main road to the coast and pulled over ONLY RVs and wrote tickets to every one that didn't have proper plates. Now in some states if you are in an accident and you seriously injure or (God forbid) cause someones death that plate WILL NOT save you from being charged with vehicular manslaughter if you were exceding the manufacturers GVWR or GCWR. On top of that if the Law concludes you were overloaded and/or exersizing an unsafe practice your insurance company will very likely abandon you, especally if it turns into a multimillion $$ lawsuit. They can and often do this, read the fine print in your policy. Now do what you want, think what you want, but be careful, and whatever you do don't think it can't happen to you.

 

Russ



#19 OFFLINE   dubob

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 02:12 PM

Shortly after passage of the law Troopers set up a roadblock on the main road to the coast and pulled over ONLY RVs and wrote tickets to every one that didn't have proper plates.

 

Russ

Were the troppers pulling over vehicles with plates from states other than Alabama and writing citations?  I’m no lawyer, but that doesn’t sound like something they can enforce on vehicles licensed in some other state.  Here is what I found on RV Safety.com:

 

Size limitations: Height, 13'6"; Width, 8'6"; trailer length, 40'; motorhome length, 45'; combined length 65'. Triple towing is not allowed.

 

Required Equipment: Safety chain, breakaway switch required on trailers over 3,000 pounds, flares or reflective signs, fire extinguisher in RV suggested, but not required. Brakes required on trailers with unladen weight of 3,000 pounds. Wipers on and lights when required.

 

Nothing there about weight.  I checked a couple of other sites and the only weight restriction I found was 20,000 per axle max.  I wouldn’t want to be anywhere near a truck and camper exceeding that limit.


:usa:
Bob Hicks, from Utah
I’m 76 years young and going as hard as I can for as long as I can.
“Free men don't ask permission to bear arms.” ― Glen Aldrich
“Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter,
and those who matter don’t mind.” ― Dr. Seuss

2010 Chevy Silverado 2500HD, SRW, 6.0L gas/2011 Lance 992


#20 OFFLINE   Rick1985

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 04:51 PM

No one can produce such documentation. All engineered products have a load design and a breaking load point. I wish I could remember who made some great posts about how he tested trucks to the breaking point for a manufacturer. Many others have suggested that the difference between the factory GVWR and the total capacity of the factory rated tires is probably the safety factor.

That was Knighteagle I believe.






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