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#61 OFFLINE   sooty1234

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Posted 23 December 2011 - 12:22 PM

You guys are all crazy for overloading your trucks. lol
[IMG]http://i725.photobuc...ct/b3f10aec.jpg[/IMG]


Pete , You are right about that. I would never do such a thing. YMMV, Jim

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#62 OFFLINE   atchafalaya_man

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 06:05 AM

Since this is our new rig, we're now selling the truck camper.


Sailor:
I saw this Florida rig at a WalMart parking lot and thought of your future travels.
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#63 OFFLINE   SailorJoe

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 07:20 AM

LOL... that would be one way to get a bit more soom for guests! Merry Christmas to all

#64 OFFLINE   Tillerman

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 09:56 AM

I wonder what the flat tow rating is? How high can they go for a big DP? Be perfect for weekend getaways while you lounge in the big rig set up in a nice park!

#65 OFFLINE   Rick1985

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 02:40 PM

That must be one hell of a tow bar!!!

#66 OFFLINE   SailorJoe

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 03:05 PM

yeah hard to say... but he's probably pushing the limits there.. My tow rating on my Diesel Gulfstream 'Windseeker' on the Freightliner chassis is just 5000 lbs... and GCVWR is just the bare coach weight plus the 5000 plus maybe another 4000 for onboard stuff. I think it is the brakes more than anything that determine those ratings if there is little or no tongue weight as with a tow bar. My TC weighs in at about 14,000 lbs though so that would be 5000 lbs over even if we had nothing in the garage and no personal gear, and of course who travels with nothing? Maybe if a guy had a trick system which could actuate the TC brakes back there you might be ok... either that or you have one helluva GCVWR.

My boat weighs about 4300 with the tandme axle trailer, and we usually have a few hundred pounds of personal gear in there for travelling, but we always keep it well under the 5000 towing limit. Then with my little Chevy Tracker in the garage at about 2400 that gives us about another 1500 lbs available for stuff. We are usually pushing our limits. I always dump my black/grey water and empty my fresh water holding tank down to 20 gallons or less, to keep the weight within tolerances.

We have hit the weigh stations a number of times and are typically weighing in at about 7,500 lbs front axle and 19,500 lbs rear rear axle. I added an extra leaf spring on the rear axle of the Coach just for good measure... and am running dually G rated Goodyear G670 RV MRT's at 110 psi on the rear so we're well within the spec there. And as for braking, I always run with the exhaust brakes around town and those will kick in the moment I pop my foot off the accelerator. On the open road, I use the Allison transmission's manual option to gear down accordingly to hold my speed on the steep declines. I can generally hold around 50 mph downhill with only tapping the brakes occasionally on 6% grades or less.

#67 OFFLINE   Max Chill

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 07:49 AM

Before every trip I check/adjust tire air pressure and check wheel lug nuts for tightness. I have been pleased with stock braking, an exhaust brake is a future upgrade. I appreciate everyones input and I have confidence, that for the majority, no one here puts their family or the public at risk hauling heavy campers.
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#68 OFFLINE   atchafalaya_man

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 08:16 AM

Regarding an exhaust brake, my experience on my 5.9 CD and a PacBrake is, if you are driving an automatic, it is likened to driving a standard transmission, and quickly downshifting one gear as soon as you let off the throttle.

It is not a dramatic neck-jarring reduction as some people envision. Touching the throttle to resume motion has the same effect as going back to the gear in which you started.

One cool thing it does is kick in when you pick up too much speed on a downhill while on cruise control. It gives your cruise control a second brain to slow you down on a hill, just as the cruise control keeps you speeded up when going up hill.

Driving is more fun with it.


#69 OFFLINE   Gaget

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 07:04 AM

thanks for the heads up... On my new rig I'm running nice new Goodyear 255/70r22.5's with max pressure of 120 psi. So not too worried about blowouts. But maintaining correct tire pressure is one of the key issues in safe operation and long tire life. Lots online about that...

So yeah I wanted to get an onboard compressor, one capable of pumping up tires carrying 110 or 120 PSI at a reasonable speed. I had purchased a Q Industries one for about $80 from O'Reilly and they are just junk. No one should waste their money. Now I am gonna get a much better one and trying to decide between 12v or 110. Like the VIAIR 40047 portable Air Compressor. Amazon has them for about $300 with free shipping. Or... I was thinking of going with 110v where you get a little more punch for the buck - like a Rol-Air FC2002 2 HP. Since we almost exclusively stay in RV parks for any length of time with full hookups, I'm not sure I need or want a 12v unit. I would be interested in anyone else's experience with this


Here is a nice setup. Working on installing this on my rig and removing the twin Electric air compressors, this is a neat factory lookign setup. Plus it is quiet.
www.extremeoutback.com

#70 OFFLINE   SailorJoe

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 09:56 AM

Hi... Extreme Outback's air compressors look like nice ones. I didn't come across them in my search. I actually had purchased the Rolair 110v which is a REALLY nice little unit... If you only need to get 80 or 90 psi out of your compressor, and you want a 110v, that is the one I would recommend: FC1250LS3 from http://www.portlandcompressor.com.

But as it turned out, it was NOT up to the job of pressurizing my big RV tires to 110 psi... it would cut out at around 96. It was great up to there... fast and quiet. But that's about all it could do. I live near Portland Air and I took it back... they tried adjusting the output but then it blew the cold start switch, so I just returned it for refund.

Instead I purchased this one:
http://www.viaircorp...l/400PA-RV.html
purchased from Amazon.com for $290 with free shipping. This is a 12v unit, specifically intended for high pressure RV tires, and it does a great job. It comes with the necessary fittings and an inline gauge right by the fill gun, plus two coiled air hoses and a soft case. I like the little screw-on valve stem connector. Then I bought a 24" hose extension from Napa for $20 so I can connect to the valve stem and then stand up straight while I fill the tire and watch the gauge. The only thing it does not have is adjustable output like the Rolair. That was nice... set the desired pressure on the gauge, attach to the valve stem and walk away, and wait til it shuts off.

With this Viair 12v you have to hold the airgun trigger until it's done. If you are adding a lot of air, this can take a few minutes. I was airing up from 80 to 115 and it probably took about 3-4 minutes... so I dug a spring clamp out of my toolbox and I just clipped that over the trigger and then it's a hands free operation. But you still have to keep an eye on it, although there's a safety and the compressor will auto shutoff at 125 psi if you get distracted. On my new rig, I am running G-rated Goodyear G670 RV tires which can carry 120 psi, and with my weight load according to Goodyear's chart, I should run 115 in the rear dualies and 85 in front on the steers. This new Viair 400PA-RV seems to do the job.
 

#71 OFFLINE   farmer

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 09:23 AM

At home before leaving on a trip I fill up with a 110 compressor it pumps to 125 psi.
But it drops to about 100 before it starts up.
But it works okay I keep filling as it runs as its trying to get back to 125 before shutting off.
I carried this compressor for a few trips but it takes up room and I never used it on the road.

On the road I bought a 12 volt compressor from Costco, it's claim to pump up to 150 psi.
I modified it to first pump into an old hospital oxygen tank as a reservoir, then when enough pressure use it to fill, instead off holding it on the stem.
The compressor comes in a small bag and the oxygen tank about 18" long 4.5" diameter.

From the experience of all the compressors I have used over the years, the ones with the tanks work the best.

#72 OFFLINE   atchafalaya_man

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 11:00 AM

At home before leaving on a trip I fill up with a 110 compressor it pumps to 125 psi.
But it drops to about 100 before it starts up.
But it works okay I keep filling as it runs as its trying to get back to 125 before shutting off.
I carried this compressor for a few trips but it takes up room and I never used it on the road.

On the road I bought a 12 volt compressor from Costco, it's claim to pump up to 150 psi.
I modified it to first pump into an old hospital oxygen tank as a reservoir, then when enough pressure use it to fill, instead off holding it on the stem.
The compressor comes in a small bag and the oxygen tank about 18" long 4.5" diameter.

From the experience of all the compressors I have used over the years, the ones with the tanks work the best.


This conversation about air compressors brought to mind a test that I did for JerBear when he too was looking for a 12v compressor to top off his tires on the road. The question of how long would it take to fill a flat was posed, so I did a test. Below are the results we posted back then. The compressor I used cost about 80 dollars as I remember. It was marketed under a 'Goodyear' brand by Northern Tool, and was the top of the line in that particular model, etc. The tire in question was a Michelin 17" stock tire on my Dodge Dually. I can only imagine filling a 19.5 monster.

Writing to JerBear, I posted:

"OK; RESULTS OF MY REAL WORLD TEST:

80 DEGREES; SUNNY TIRE; REMOVED CORE AND FLATTENED TIRE DOWN TO THE GROUND. CONNECTED PUMP AND SHOWED 2 PSI ON GAUGE AT REST. WITHOUT TRUCK ENGINE RUNNING, I BEGAN FILLING. POWER WAS FROM PLUG-IN POWER OUTLET ON DASH.

1 MIN: 12 PSI
2 MIN: 18 PSI (NOTICED RAISING OF TRUCK)
3 MIN: 26 PSI (TRUCK BARELY DRIVABLE IF NECESSARY)
4 MIN: 30 PSI
5 MIN: 33 PSI SOMEWHERE IN HERE YOU'D KNOW YOU WERE NEEDING AIR BADLY...
6 MIN: 37 PSI
7 MIN: 40 PSI NOTICED THE SOUND OF THE PUMP STARTED TO SLOW DOWN SLIGHTLY
8 MIN: 44 PSI THE OUTLET HOSE FROM THE PUMP (BLACK RUBBER) WAS HOT TO THE TOUCH (COMPRESSION)
9 MIN: 47 PSI THE MOTOR OF THE PUMP WAS COOL AND THE FINS WERE SOMEWHAT HOT..DOING THEIR JOB WITH THE HEAT.
10 MIN: 50.2 PSI
11 MIN: 54 PSI
12 MIN: 57 PSI
13 MIN: 60 PSI
14 MIN: 63 PSI
15 MIN: 66 PSI
16 MIN: 69 PSI PATTERN HERE OF 3 PSI PER MINUTE.....
17 MIN: 72 PSI I DECIDED TO START THE TRUCK TO PROVIDE MORE VOLTAGE AS I FELT THE MOTOR WAS SLOWING A BIT MORE....
18 MIN: 74 PSI NOTICED MOTOR GAINED SPEED BACK TO ORIGINAL SPEED..
19 MIN: 77 PSI
20 MIN: 80 PSI

WHEN UNPLUGGING THE LIGHTER PLUG, I GRABBED THE METAL PARTS OF IT TO CHECK FOR TEMPERATURE. AN IMMEDIATE BURN...AND 'OH..DON'T DO THAT.' THE METAL CONTACTS WERE HOT ENOUGH TO LEAVE A MARK IF I HAD HELD THEM LONGER. I CHOSE TO LEAVE THE PUMP OUT FOR THE TIME BEING BEFORE WRAPPING IT ALL UP IN ITS CARRYING BAG. DIDN'T WANT TO BURN ANYTHING PLASTIC IN THERE.

SO, IT LOOKS LIKE YOU WILL NEED 20 MINUTES FOR A TOTALLY FLAT TIRE. A NOTABLE LOW TIRE IS IN THE 30-40 POUND RANGE, SO YOU'D NEED 12-15 MINUTES TO BRING IT UP TO A FULL 80 PSI.

SO, YOU COULD PROBABLY BRING A 30 PSI 'LOW TIRE' UP TO ABOUT 60-70 PSI IN 8 TO 10 MINUTES AND DRIVE ON LOOKING FOR A FIX.

ALSO, HAD I RUN THE MOTOR FROM THE START, I MIGHT HAVE SHAVED...ONE OR TWO MINUTES OFF THE WHOLE PROCESS...

THAT'S WHY WE TEST.

DOUGIE


#73 OFFLINE   farmer

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 12:27 PM

Wow Doug
With those times, I hopefully will only be topping off.
I have gator caps on my valve stems, so no threading and I doubt I could thread on the air hose on the inside duals anyways.
I use a 5" long angle chuck with a 6" piece of 1/4" brass pipe attached to extend to reach the inside duals.
I thought about pipe extensions on the valves but it would be one more thing to maintain or leak.
Rick

#74 OFFLINE   atchafalaya_man

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 01:26 PM

Wow Doug
With those times, I hopefully will only be topping off.
I have gator caps on my valve stems, so no threading and I doubt I could thread on the air hose on the inside duals anyways.
I use a 5" long angle chuck with a 6" piece of 1/4" brass pipe attached to extend to reach the inside duals.
I thought about pipe extensions on the valves but it would be one more thing to maintain or leak.
Rick


I wonder what a 110 volt pump would do. It might be worth starting the generator to run one of those if the time went to 1/3 of that. Otherwise, it's astounding how long it took. I expected 5 minutes; not 20.

At the 33 pound mark, or 15 minutes to go. I note that "Somewhere in here, you'd know you were needing air badly." At the 50 PSI mark (1/2 of the way at 10 minutes in on my test) the tire looked pretty full, but it had to go to 80 PSI.

Mine took the additional 10 minutes to go from 50.2 to 80, so you have a comparison point from which to start and time a top-off.

Why not drop yours to 50 PSI and compare the fill time, just so you'll know what you are faced with.

Doug


#75 OFFLINE   SailorJoe

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 02:44 PM

In my case the Goodyear Unisteel G670 RV 22.5" tires are much too big and heavy to even consider changing myself. Gulfstream does not even provide a jack and lug wrench with the rig. And they are put on with very high torque. So if my 120 psi tires are down to 30 psi or something, then I am not looking to pump it up myself. Obviously it needs repair, I have no spare, so I am calling a service truck on my insurance policy's towing and service clause. What I wanted was something I could use to bring them back up to full pressure if they have lost a little from sitting for a month or two.

Depending on where you are you *could* drive out looking for a service station with a pump with enough capacity to pump to 100+ psi. A lot of them have gone to those cheesy little 50c for 3 minutes of air boxes. Forget those. So you may need to find a tire dealership or something and wait your turn. And anyhow, the worst thing you can do is drive a heavy rig on underinflated tires. And when the tires cost $650 each I wanna take good care of them. So the Viair 400PA-RV suits my purposes well. As mentioned it brought my tires up from 80 - 115 in the space of several minutes.

As for connecting the thread-on to the inside duals, I have stainless steel covered valve extensions like these
http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/B000T8E5LI
so all four dually tires can be easily pressure-checked and inflated as needed. The Viair also comes with a 14" long chuck to reach through if you don't have these extensions, but I think those are the way to go. I hope I will get good service from the Viair, but I have bookmarked the 12v Air Compressors from Extreme Outback just in case.




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