Jump to content

 
 

Announcements

Lots of new items for sale in our store. Click here

Photo

Heavy Camper


74 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   Max Chill

Max Chill

    Poster

  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • Local time: 07:53 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Colorado
  • Camper Brand:Host
  • Truck Make & Model:Ford F250

Posted 11 September 2010 - 06:23 PM

I would like to hear any stories of accidents due to hauling a heavy camper. I am sure there are plenty of blown tires. What about overloaded axles giving way, or suspensions and frames failing? The discussions on here have some warning others about being overweight and needing a dually. I have yet to read posts citing accidents caused by SRW trucks with heavy campers. Are there any examples to cite?
I have plenty of upgrades to my F250 and I am comfortable at 65 mph down smooth roads. Is this a false sense of security?
2006 F250 PSD Lariat KR CC LB
Air bags
Overloads
Upgraded sway bars
Rickson 19.5 w/Bridgestones
Host Tahoe loaded

#2 OFFLINE   PigPen

PigPen

    Founder-Director-IT Admin-Corperate Relations- Root Forum Admin

  • Admin
  • 12473 posts
  • Local time: 07:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:BC
  • Country:Canada
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Abbotsford BC, Canada
  • Camper Brand:2014 Snowriver 234RBS TT
  • Truck Make & Model:2007 Dodge Diesel 5.9 Laramie SB
  • Name (Public):Paul Beddows

Posted 11 September 2010 - 09:45 PM

I have never heard of a 3/4 ton & up frame failing due to a heavy camper. I think the main danger are brakes. Poor maintained or people towing a trailer plus a camper without trailer brakes. Campers strain Truck brakes to the limit as they are without adding a couple of 1000 lbs of trailer pushing as well.

2014 Snowriver 234RBS

 

trailer.JPG


#3 OFFLINE   RedneckExpress

RedneckExpress

    Root Forum Admin

  • Admin
  • 3208 posts
  • Local time: 06:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:Oregon
  • Country:USA
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sauvie Island, OR
  • Interests:Camper Restoration, Antique RVs, Camping, Fishing, Full-timing, Gardening, Cigars
  • Camper Brand:1974 KIT 1106 Kamper
  • Truck Make & Model:Dodge Power Wagon W-250 "Dually" 4x4 5.9L V8 TBI 4 speed H.D Tranny 4.10 Gears
  • Name (Public):RedneckExpress

Posted 11 September 2010 - 09:56 PM

I'm currently prepping for a rear axle swap on my 3/4 ton Dodge. I have a used late 70s Winnebago Spicer 70 Dually axle that's taking the place of the original Dana 60 that's on the truck. The original axle is starting to show signs of wear from abuse caused by heavy camper + poor off road conditions. Rather than risk a possible failure at some point, safer to swap up to a bigger axle for the extra safety margin.

Follow me as I full-time the Redneck Way at The Journey of the Redneck Express

 

CB Channel 17
Redneck Express
'1992 Dodge W-250 Club Cab Long Bed "Dually" V8 5.9l 4spd H.D Auto 4x4 4.10 Gears
'1974 KIT 1106 Kamper
'2006 Heartland Bighorn 3400RL Fifth wheel
'1987 Custom Built Pullman Mini Camper (The Pullman Mini Camper Project)
'2004 Bi-Mart 1000lbs Cargo Trailer (Chuck wagon)
signature_banner_500x.jpg


#4 OFFLINE   Rick1985

Rick1985

    Grand Potentate

  • NATCOA Members
  • 538 posts
  • Local time: 09:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:NJ
  • Country:USA
  • Gender:Male
  • Camper Brand:Fleetwood
  • Truck Make & Model:Dodge Ram 3500

Posted 12 September 2010 - 04:46 AM

On my 96 F250 the rear axle is the same as used in the F350, I did swap out the front TTB axle for a solid Dana 60 front but not so much for weight as for old fashioned reliability. I was tired of replacing ball joints every two years. I replaced the rear springs due to a broken leaf (before camper, not from camper) and I found a lot of rust behind the rotted out spring hanger. That has me a little concerned. I can tell you that trailer brake are a necessity when towing with a camper. Like was already said the truck and camper alone are max for the truck brakes, the trailer needs to stop it's own weight.


Rick

#5 OFFLINE   vanceman

vanceman

    Grand Potentate

  • Members
  • 293 posts
  • Local time: 07:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:co
  • Country:usa
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:golfing water and snow skiing, hiking and biking, gardening camping fishing
  • Camper Brand:2012 northern lite 10-2 cdse
  • Truck Make & Model:03 dodge ram 3500 srw 285 19.5 wheels and tires, road master sway bar, air lift air bags in cab controller, stable loads, tork lift tie downs,pack brake exhaust, ats tranny,4 inch exhaust ats manifold ,aurora 3000 turbo ,afe air intake ,
  • Name (Public):don

Posted 12 September 2010 - 05:34 AM

On my 96 F250 the rear axle is the same as used in the F350, I did swap out the front TTB axle for a solid Dana 60 front but not so much for weight as for old fashioned reliability. I was tired of replacing ball joints every two years. I replaced the rear springs due to a broken leaf (before camper, not from camper) and I found a lot of rust behind the rotted out spring hanger. That has me a little concerned. I can tell you that trailer brake are a necessity when towing with a camper. Like was already said the truck and camper alone are max for the truck brakes, the trailer needs to stop it's own weight.

When i bought my 03 dodge 3500 srw the only differance between the 2500 and the 3500 was the overload spring on the 3500.The 2500 had a 9000 lb gvwr and the 3500 with over load spring had a gvwr of 9900. I also have a pac brake exhaust brake on my truck works great. Ive been down loveland pass, vail pass and rabbit ears pass in colorado and truck will hold at 45mph to 50mph all the way down these passes, very little use of the brakes. If your pulling a boat or trailer i agree make sure you have trailer brakes and get your brakes inspected twice a year and always leave a 4 to 6 sec following time behind the vehicle in front of you.You can also go to a spring shop and upgrade your main spring pack or upgrade your overload spring pack, the factory overloads are ok but upgraded springs are made of better quality steel. When you go to a spring shop have the camper on your truck.I think the ricksons are the best upgrade you can get.
Rick



#6 OFFLINE   farmer

farmer

    Past President

  • NATCOA Members
  • 1750 posts
  • Local time: 06:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:BC
  • Country:Canada
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Surrey, BC, Canada, North America, Earth
  • Camper Brand:2003 Bigfoot 30C10.11SL
  • Truck Make & Model:Class 5 2005 Ford F-550 365 cu.in. Powerstroke Diesel4x4 Lariat crewcab 10' flatdeck
  • Name (Public):Rick and Susanne

Posted 12 September 2010 - 07:50 AM

I think the biggest problem out there is the tires, and the biggest thing is proper inflation.
Look on the freeways at all the chunks of tires littering the lanes and shoulders.
You don't see much tire chunks on slower side streets.
With the higher speeds the under inflated tires flex more and heat up.
I check my tires every 3 weeks and the 2 front tires have lost about 10lb.s each, the 4 rears stay the same.

Over 15 years ago there was a safety recall on Ford Explorer tires the were blowing out on the freeways, especially in hot climates.
The problem was the door jamb on the vehicle said to inflate to a certain pressure, which was wrong, the tires ended up under inflated.
Everyone should look up their tire's inflation tables on the internet and inflate accordingly.

Get your self a good quality tire gauge, some of them are out 10lb.s
Or you can make your own, get a air chuck with the 5" pipe, short rubber flex hose from a grease gun, and a 2" dial pressure gauge from a plumbing supply, put it all together and you have a nice easy to read gauge.

Touch your tires after a drive they should be warm not hot.

#7 OFFLINE   samiam

samiam

    Grand Potentate

  • Members
  • 113 posts
  • Local time: 07:53 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Keizer, Oregon
  • Interests:camping, snow skiing, fishing, family activities
  • Camper Brand:2000 Citation Supreme 10'6" (no-slide)
  • Truck Make & Model:1999 Ford F-350 7.3L CC LB SRW

Posted 12 September 2010 - 08:08 AM

The brake shop told me I had "six months easily" left on my brake pads. The next weekend I did about 40 miles through mountain logging roads with the camper on, weighing about 11,500 in my SRW F350, doing about 15 mph uphill and riding the brakes downhill. As I came down to the end of the road on my way back to civilization I smelled something hot. All four brakes were smoking. Visible white'ish smoke. Wheels were so hot i could hardly touch them. Resulted in two new rotors, two new calipers, and brake pads all around. Of course I used upgraded slotted rotors, and next time around i'll upgrade pads. I also found a busted bolt on my airbag mount two weeks ago. not sure if that's related. The airbags are 18 months old and one has just started leaking and needs replaced. they are Firestone.

#8 OFFLINE   rskeans

rskeans

    Grand Potentate

  • Members
  • 84 posts
  • Local time: 07:53 AM
  • Location:Running Springs, CA.
  • Camper Brand:OKANAGAN 117 DBL
  • Truck Make & Model:'08 Ford F350 CC DRW 4x4 6.4L
  • Name (Public):Bob

Posted 12 September 2010 - 08:28 AM

I would like to hear any stories of accidents due to hauling a heavy camper. I am sure there are plenty of blown tires. What about overloaded axles giving way, or suspensions and frames failing? The discussions on here have some warning others about being overweight and needing a dually. I have yet to read posts citing accidents caused by SRW trucks with heavy campers. Are there any examples to cite?
I have plenty of upgrades to my F250 and I am comfortable at 65 mph down smooth roads. Is this a false sense of security?


I have a DRW and am significantly overweight. But the axles (Dana 80 rated at 11,500 lbs by Dana) and tires (rated at 11,620 lbs at 80PSI) are well within specs. However, I took the road down in Mounument Valley, UT. This road has some serious ruts and dips. The DW thought we would turn over and became irate. Two things happened on that road.
1. An overload spring contact bracket broke off. It is in place with 4 hardened rivets. I have 3 extra overload springs on each axle. The spring with the broken bracket did pop up through the truck bed (no other damage). All of this was in 4WD granny.

2. My 62 gal fuel tank is steel and hard mounted to the frame. The frame flex cracked a seam in the tank creating a minor weaping of fuel. Actually I am assuming that it was frame flex. It could have been the road or boulder hitting the tank even though it is equipped with a steel skid plate. The manufacturer repaired it under warranty.

So, if you are going to push it with weight, definetly don't go where the camper will be getting wild sideways swings. And also make sure that you are well within the axle and tire manufacturer's weight ratings. I don't intend to push it on a road or trail like that again.
'08 Ford F350 Lariet CC 4x4 Dually 6.4L 62 Gal fuel tank
'07 Okanagan 117dbl Dual slide, rear sofa, 64gal fresh water, 3.6KW generator

#9 OFFLINE   Rick1985

Rick1985

    Grand Potentate

  • NATCOA Members
  • 538 posts
  • Local time: 09:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:NJ
  • Country:USA
  • Gender:Male
  • Camper Brand:Fleetwood
  • Truck Make & Model:Dodge Ram 3500

Posted 12 September 2010 - 10:02 AM

The brake shop told me I had "six months easily" left on my brake pads. The next weekend I did about 40 miles through mountain logging roads with the camper on, weighing about 11,500 in my SRW F350, doing about 15 mph uphill and riding the brakes downhill. As I came down to the end of the road on my way back to civilization I smelled something hot. All four brakes were smoking. Visible white'ish smoke. Wheels were so hot i could hardly touch them. Resulted in two new rotors, two new calipers, and brake pads all around. Of course I used upgraded slotted rotors, and next time around i'll upgrade pads. I also found a busted bolt on my airbag mount two weeks ago. not sure if that's related. The airbags are 18 months old and one has just started leaking and needs replaced. they are Firestone.


Keep in mind brakes can only do so much, the rest is the driver. Granted, in the situation you were in you had to ride the brakes. Brakes work by friction which creates heat which decreases friction which means you have to push harder on the pedal creating more heat. See where this is headed? You were very lucky that you did not lose the pedal from lack of friction or worse the pad seals burning and spraying brake fluid on the red hot rotors and going up in flames. I have seen that many times. Be very careful the next time because the white smoke is seconds away from NO BRAKES!!!!


Rick

#10 OFFLINE   Max Chill

Max Chill

    Poster

  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • Local time: 07:53 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Colorado
  • Camper Brand:Host
  • Truck Make & Model:Ford F250

Posted 12 September 2010 - 09:07 PM

So far no stories of swerving into oncoming traffic caused by hauling a heavy camper, just wear and tear you find hauling heavy loads by pickup truck. I tow my jeep often and was quite surprised how well the truck stops the load. I closely monitor my following distance and try to anticipate traffic patterns to stay out of trouble. I keep the transmission in tow/haul mode and have never had to ride the brakes downhill. I have been up and over most mountains passes in Colorado with no problems.

With a healthy dose of caution I will continue to enjoy hauling a heavy camper on my SRW truck.
2006 F250 PSD Lariat KR CC LB
Air bags
Overloads
Upgraded sway bars
Rickson 19.5 w/Bridgestones
Host Tahoe loaded

#11 OFFLINE   nstate

nstate

    Poster

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • Local time: 06:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:California
  • Country:USA
  • Gender:Male
  • Camper Brand:Host Everest Triple Slide
  • Truck Make & Model:Dodge 3500

Posted 16 September 2010 - 08:21 PM

This is a very good post. I can tell you that i put a Host Yellowstone that weights in at about 5100lbs. on my Dodge 1-ton dually. I have a set of 4500# springs(90003 total) and firestone airbbags. That cured the side sways and leveling issues. Now going downhill became a major scary situation. I installed a Pacbrake exhaust brake and it holds STRONG down to about 23 mph. Rarely ever even touch my service brakes. Here in N.California we have some steeps ups and downs. Huge safety factor.
2007 Host Everest Triple Slide TS11.5
1997 Dodge 3500 1-ton dually,5.9 Cummins w/ Banks Turbo system and stage 2 injectors
Hi-Pro 47 trans,triple billet torque convertor and GearVendor overdrive system
9000lb suspension springs with FireStone dual airbags w/ onboard compressor
4" turbo back exhaust
4" PacBrake exhaust brake

#12 OFFLINE   dunegoon

dunegoon

    Tenderfoot

  • Members
  • 14 posts
  • Local time: 06:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:Oregon
  • Country:USA
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Roseburg, Oregon
  • Interests:Sandrails! Tow a 27' enclosed car trailer behind the TC, 20,000# combined weight. Options of interest: Kenwood 7300 Navigation system in the truck, use a Scangage II connected to OBDII port, Camper has Lynksys router with AT&T data card for mobile Wi-Fi.
  • Camper Brand:Bigfoot 9.5'
  • Truck Make & Model:F350 4x4 crew cab dually, 6.0 diesel, AT
  • Name (Public):Dunegoon

Posted 16 September 2010 - 08:50 PM

A dually becomes more necessary if you travel often on dirt or gravel back roads with dips, sways, and potholes, or if you experience strong cross-winds such as in the Columbia River Gorge or most anywhere in Wyoming. Also, the dually seems nice if you tow a trailer in addition to the camper unit.

For travel on major roads, even uphill or down, --- not so much.
1999 Bigfoot 2500, 9.5 ft. 2003 F350 4x4 Dually, A/T, 6.0 diesel. Tow a 22' (27' OAL) Pace enclosed trailer, 20,000# combined weight with the sandrail in the trailer.

#13 OFFLINE   vanceman

vanceman

    Grand Potentate

  • Members
  • 293 posts
  • Local time: 07:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:co
  • Country:usa
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:golfing water and snow skiing, hiking and biking, gardening camping fishing
  • Camper Brand:2012 northern lite 10-2 cdse
  • Truck Make & Model:03 dodge ram 3500 srw 285 19.5 wheels and tires, road master sway bar, air lift air bags in cab controller, stable loads, tork lift tie downs,pack brake exhaust, ats tranny,4 inch exhaust ats manifold ,aurora 3000 turbo ,afe air intake ,
  • Name (Public):don

Posted 17 September 2010 - 04:24 AM

This is a very good post. I can tell you that i put a Host Yellowstone that weights in at about 5100lbs. on my Dodge 1-ton dually. I have a set of 4500# springs(90003 total) and firestone airbbags. That cured the side sways and leveling issues. Now going downhill became a major scary situation. I installed a Pacbrake exhaust brake and it holds STRONG down to about 23 mph. Rarely ever even touch my service brakes. Here in N.California we have some steeps ups and downs. Huge safety factor.

I also have a pac brake exhaust on my 03 dodge. In colorado I have been over loveland pass, vail pass and rabbit ears pass truck holds at 45 to 50 mph all the way down these passes, what a sense of safety. I also have a controler that sets the speed that locks up the torque converter from ats diesel. The pac brake works great I cant imagine going down these passes without it, it would be very scary.

#14 OFFLINE   Max Chill

Max Chill

    Poster

  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • Local time: 07:53 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Colorado
  • Camper Brand:Host
  • Truck Make & Model:Ford F250

Posted 19 September 2010 - 07:13 PM

This is a very good post. I can tell you that i put a Host Yellowstone that weights in at about 5100lbs. on my Dodge 1-ton dually. I have a set of 4500# springs(90003 total) and firestone airbbags. That cured the side sways and leveling issues. Now going downhill became a major scary situation. I installed a Pacbrake exhaust brake and it holds STRONG down to about 23 mph. Rarely ever even touch my service brakes. Here in N.California we have some steeps ups and downs. Huge safety factor.


An exhaust brake will probably be my next upgrade. I looked into auxillary braking systems for the jeep and just wasnt satisfied with the options I researched. I would like to hear more about after market engine/exhaust brakes since braking is the biggest safety factor on everyones radar. I would probably upgrade the exhaust system along with the brake.

In Tow/Haul I had the 6.0 at 3100 rpm holding the truck back just under 55 mph down Rabbit Ears. Pushing on the brake pedal I would drop it to 2800 rpm then coast back up to ~3100, I guess this is ok, but its sure makes me cringe hearing the motor spun up that tight.
2006 F250 PSD Lariat KR CC LB
Air bags
Overloads
Upgraded sway bars
Rickson 19.5 w/Bridgestones
Host Tahoe loaded

#15 OFFLINE   clamdigger

clamdigger

    Tenderfoot

  • Members
  • 8 posts
  • Local time: 11:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:Nova Scotia
  • Country:Canada
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Auburn, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Camper Brand:Veri-Lite
  • Truck Make & Model:01 Dodge 2500 CTD 4x4
  • Name (Public):Bob

Posted 20 September 2010 - 08:26 AM

If your using the transmission or the exhaust brake to keep on speed is there a danger of burning an exhaust valve?

Bob
RCAF
01 5.9L Dodge CTD 2500 4x4 Laramie SLT Reg Cab SRW
91 2.5L Jeep YJ 31x10.5x15 SuperWinch 10000
00 1.3L Suzuki Swift
88 1.0L Kawasaki Concours 208,000kms!
04 .28L Suzuki King Quad Warn2.5i and plow
99 Veri-Lite 9.5, Series 50, DUL Edition
Posted Image

#16 OFFLINE   drag racer

drag racer

    Grand Potentate

  • Members
  • 129 posts
  • Local time: 07:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:CA
  • Country:USA
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fullerton, CA
  • Interests:Camping, drag racing, reading, travel, home remodeling
  • Truck Make & Model:Ford F350
  • Name (Public):Phil

Posted 20 September 2010 - 03:49 PM

I would like to hear any stories of accidents due to hauling a heavy camper. I am sure there are plenty of blown tires. What about overloaded axles giving way, or suspensions and frames failing? The discussions on here have some warning others about being overweight and needing a dually. I have yet to read posts citing accidents caused by SRW trucks with heavy campers. Are there any examples to cite?
I have plenty of upgrades to my F250 and I am comfortable at 65 mph down smooth roads. Is this a false sense of security?


From your signature it shows you have upgraded to 19.5 wheels/tires which is a step in the right direction.

As far as accidents, the only thing I have had happen was I spit out a rear tire tread (285/75/16) on Hwy 70 about one hour
east of Grand Junction a year ago this month on my way to Denver to visit family (did not have the camper yet).

As the tread headed out the back of the truck it ripped open the left 1/4 panel on the truck bed like it was a can opener, lifted
the truck rear up in the air like I was driving over a log and peeled the chrome off part of the rear bumper.

By the way the tire did not go flat, just lost the whole outter tread.

When AAA got there (actually quite fast really) he had to put my spare (265/75/16) on the front and move that tire to the rear.
I gave him a good tip.

Once in Denver I purchased a new set of 4 BFG in the stock size (265/75/16) have had no further problems and my fuel
milage went up 2 mpg on the fwy.

Once home, it cost the insurance $3K minus my deductable to replace the 1/4 panel.
Phil & Alberta Saran
2004 F350 diesel 4dr/4X4
Fullerton, CA.

#17 OFFLINE   wildbill59

wildbill59

    Poster

  • Members
  • 22 posts
  • Local time: 06:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:nv.
  • Country:us.
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:spring creek,nv.
  • Interests:hunting,fishing and camping
  • Camper Brand:1991 10.5ft.caribou
  • Truck Make & Model:2009 dodge 2500, 4x4 q-cab,LB,6.7 cummins
  • Name (Public):bill

Posted 21 September 2010 - 06:31 AM

amen to the engine brake in tow/haul mode.i rarely have to touch my service brakes.

#18 OFFLINE   nstate

nstate

    Poster

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • Local time: 06:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:California
  • Country:USA
  • Gender:Male
  • Camper Brand:Host Everest Triple Slide
  • Truck Make & Model:Dodge 3500

Posted 21 September 2010 - 08:17 PM

Maxchill- Pacbrake included a set of heavy duty exhaust springs with their kit. I was assured by their factory that use of the brake was not stressful on the engine. Infact, they strongly recommend frequent use as opposed to only activating it once every couple months. Installing the exhaust springs was the hardest part of the install. The brake bolts right up to the turbo. I did alot of research before choosing Pacbrake as they have a very advanced system out. I also found a dealer off the internet that gave me by far the best price. If you would like to call him i will post up his number. They really are impressive.
2007 Host Everest Triple Slide TS11.5
1997 Dodge 3500 1-ton dually,5.9 Cummins w/ Banks Turbo system and stage 2 injectors
Hi-Pro 47 trans,triple billet torque convertor and GearVendor overdrive system
9000lb suspension springs with FireStone dual airbags w/ onboard compressor
4" turbo back exhaust
4" PacBrake exhaust brake

#19 OFFLINE   Max Chill

Max Chill

    Poster

  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • Local time: 07:53 AM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Colorado
  • Camper Brand:Host
  • Truck Make & Model:Ford F250

Posted 22 September 2010 - 12:43 PM

Maxchill- Pacbrake included a set of heavy duty exhaust springs with their kit. I was assured by their factory that use of the brake was not stressful on the engine. Infact, they strongly recommend frequent use as opposed to only activating it once every couple months. Installing the exhaust springs was the hardest part of the install. The brake bolts right up to the turbo. I did alot of research before choosing Pacbrake as they have a very advanced system out. I also found a dealer off the internet that gave me by far the best price. If you would like to call him i will post up his number. They really are impressive.


Please post the number, website, any info you think would be useful. Thanks in nstate!
2006 F250 PSD Lariat KR CC LB
Air bags
Overloads
Upgraded sway bars
Rickson 19.5 w/Bridgestones
Host Tahoe loaded

#20 OFFLINE   Harleycb

Harleycb

    Grand Potentate

  • Members
  • 134 posts
  • Local time: 07:53 AM
  • State/Province or Region:Wyoming
  • Country:USA
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Powell, Wyoming
  • Interests:Harleys and Horses
  • Camper Brand:Snowriver
  • Truck Make & Model:'03 Ford F350 CC SRW

Posted 23 September 2010 - 11:49 AM

A dually becomes more necessary if you travel often on dirt or gravel back roads with dips, sways, and potholes, or if you experience strong cross-winds such as in the Columbia River Gorge or most anywhere in Wyoming. Also, the dually seems nice if you tow a trailer in addition to the camper unit.

For travel on major roads, even uphill or down, --- not so much.



After I bought my new SnowRiver in Denver and then came back home into Wyoming, I encountered the worst winds I've ever drove a camper in. Of course they were also coming in from the side and I was swaying side to side on our great 2 laners.

I've since upgraded to 19.5" wheels and at least 75% of that sway is gone - now if I can find out how to drop the remaining 25%...

2003 SRW F350 PSD, Banks Exhaust, 50 hp DP Tuner, ATS turbo housing, AFe Stage II intake.
2007 Snowriver 8'10" w/Polar Cub AC, 19.5" Rickson w/Toyo M608Z




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Sign In